Rocky no more

It came into being on a dark night two years before the Civil War’s first gunshots, survived a flood that washed away its press and countless threats to its very existence, then enjoyed, in the twilight of its life, recognition as one of the best newspapers in the country.

The end of the Rocky Mountain News.

Leadership: A super rejects a pay raise

Don’t know the specifics of the system, but it shows some leadership to turn down a raise hard-wired into your contract. If the entire top tier of local and state gov decided to do this we’d see some real savings.

The News & Record of Greensboro reported Friday that Guilford County school superintendent Maurice Green told the school board that giving him the 3 percent raise during the poor economy would create a hardship for the school system.

N&R story

Perhaps it was rope-a-dope

There’s the kind of unreal politics that happens in D.C. and the street level stuff that happens elsewhere. 11 competitive districts targeted.
From the NYT:

Now Mr. McCotter – whose suburban district west of Detroit is laced with unemployed autoworkers, shuttered automotive plants and struggling manufacturers – could become a test case of whether House Republicans’ united front against the economic measure was the wise political and policy course.

Democrats are mounting a new campaign to remind voters that Mr. McCotter and 11 other Republicans in competitive districts in harder-hit states opposed the stimulus package, which the president says will provide middle class tax cuts and millions of jobs – 7,800 in Mr. McCotter’s district alone, according to a calculation by the White House.

David Gregory is a creampuff

Good golly. What a seriously lame interviewer David Gregory is. Completely unchallenging on the stimulus. Jindal’s had a 20 to one sentence advantage.
Oh, Crist is up. And on CBS, we have Schwarzenegger. How nice.

Bill of the Day: Collective bargaining

Senator Shaw does the honors and introduces S178, which would repeal 95-98, which would clear the way for collective bargaining for state and local government workers.

Short Title: Repeal Ban G.S. 95-98.
Sponsors: Senator Shaw.

A BILL TO BE ENTITLED

AN ACT to repeal the prohibition on contracts between governmental entities and labor organizations for the purpose of collective bargaining.

The General Assembly of North Carolina enacts:

SECTION 1. G.S. 95‑98 is repealed.

SECTION 2. This act is effective when it becomes law.

Oh noes! NC has the lowest business tax burden in the country.

Those commies over at Ernst & Young have put the state – yes, this one here – at the bottom of the list in terms of local and state business tax burden.
This tragic turn of events will ruin the well-honed talking points of the state’s heroic radio talk show hosts and make it even harder for the legislature to balance this budget. Now they’ll have to entertain the notion that perhaps a tax loophole or two should go along with the myriad of cuts to health care and programs that serve the lower and middle classes.( Talk about burdensome.)
The study also shows that since 2002, only three other states have asked businesses to pay a lower share of state tax increases. Translated that means individuals, through income and sales taxes have paid more than 60 cents out of every dollar of new revenue.

Bill of the Day: Disapprove Jordan Lake Rules

HB3 wins the honors today for the audacity of nope. The bill would “disapprove” the Jordan Lake rules, which will require serious changes in stormwater practices for communities that feed into the lake. The big problem is that due to the NC 751 causeway (and other factors) the section of the lake that’s fed by Durham, Chapel Hill and Carrboro is a shallow bathtub filling up with nutrients. The problem with the bill is that it’s a little like declaring that the federal Clean Water Act does not apply in this section of North Carolina. The feds will beg to differ. Here the language:

Short Title: Disapprove Jordan Lake Rules.
Sponsors: Representatives Allred, McCormick (Primary Sponsors); Blust, Cole, and West.
Referred to: Rules, Calendar, and Operations of the House.

A BILL TO BE ENTITLED

AN ACT to disapprove rules adopted by the north carolina environmental management commission and approved by the rules review commission.

The General Assembly of North Carolina enacts:

SECTION 1. Pursuant to G.S. 150B‑21.3(b1), 15A NCAC 02B .0264 (Jordan Water Supply Nutrient Strategy: Agriculture), 15A NCAC 02B .0268 (Jordan Water Supply Nutrient Strategy: Mitigation for Existing Riparian Buffers), 15A NCAC 02B .0269 (Riparian Buffer Mitigation Fees to the NC Ecosystem Enhancement Program), 15A NCAC 02B .0270 (Jordan Water Supply Nutrient Strategy: Wastewater Discharge Requirements), 15A NCAC 02B .0271 (Jordan Water Supply Nutrient Strategy: Stormwater Requirements for State and Federal Entities), 15A NCAC 02B .0272 (Jordan Water Supply Nutrient Strategy: Fertilizer Management), 15A NCAC 02B .0273 (Jordan Water Supply Nutrient Strategy: Options for Offsetting Nutrient Loads), as adopted by the North Carolina Environmental Management Commission on May 8, 2008, and approved by the Rules Review Commission on October 16, 2008, are disapproved.

SECTION 2. Pursuant to G.S. 150B‑21.3(b1), 15A NCAC 02B .0262 (Jordan Water Supply Nutrient Strategy: Purpose and Scope), 15A NCAC 02B .0263 (Jordan Water Supply Nutrient Strategy: Definitions), 15A NCAC 02B .0265 (Jordan Water Supply Nutrient Strategy: Stormwater Management for New Development), 15A NCAC 02B .0266 (Jordan Water Supply Nutrient Strategy: Stormwater Management for Existing Development), 15A NCAC 02B .0267 (Jordan Water Supply Nutrient Strategy: Protection of Existing Riparian Buffers), as adopted by the North Carolina Environmental Management Commission on May 8, 2008, and approved by the Rules Review Commission on November 20, 2008, are disapproved.

SECTION 3. This act is effective when it becomes law.